Total Pageviews

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Thank You Readers of The Blog and Google Plus

Folks, we have reached 32,797 on our blogger and 92,861 on our Google+ account.


Defamation and Privacy
In new york times v. sullivan, 376 U.S. 254, 84 S. Ct. 710, 11 L. Ed. 2d 686 (1964), the U.S. Supreme Court  declared that the First Amendment protects open and robust debate on public issues, even when such debate  includes "vehement, caustic,unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials." In Sullivan, a public official  claimed that allegations about him that had appeared in the New York Times were false, and he sued the   newspaper for libel. The Court balanced the plaintiff's interest in preserving his reputation against the public's  interest in freedom of expression, particularly in the area of political debate. It decided that, in order to recover   damages, a public official must prove actual malice, which is knowledge that the statements were false or that   they were made with reckless disregard of whether they were false.

No comments:

Post a Comment