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Tuesday, January 26, 2016

A Pre-Divised Plan

Our sources tell us that Franklin is not the least bit worried about underpaying employees.  She has a plan.

Franklin, do you really think that you can make officials believe that you didn't know anything about the K9 deputies being underpaid?   Can you truly stand up in front of the clerks, the DOL, and whomever else may have an interest in determining the degree that employees have been underpaid and try to make them believe that you knew nothing about the payroll errors?

What would a MCSO employee stand to gain by shorting employee's pay week after week, month after month, year after year?  Nothing.....

We did a little research and came up with five ways that may help an employee determine if they have been underpaid.

1. YOUR EMPLOYER IS USING FUZZY MATH TO ADD UP YOUR HOURS

Workers are commonly shorted out of earned overtime when employers put forth intentionally confusing explanations for overtime calculations.
For example, managers may assert that overtime is calculated based on a two-week or monthly pay period. They may claim that certain work time doesn’t count, such as “on call” time. Some employers may pay workers by the day and then claim that the weekly total of hours is not relevant.
However, federal law dictates that overtime must be calculated based on the number of hours worked per week. The company’s internal pay periods or procedures are generally irrelevant to this calculation.

2. YOUR TITLE IS MANAGER, BUT YOU WORK ALONGSIDE EVERYONE ELSE

Misclassifying employees is an extremely common way that companies duck out of overtime. Companies may craft job descriptions to classify someone as management in order to use the “white-collar exemption” when, in fact, most of the person’s duties are similar to regular workers’ responsibilities. 
It’s important to know that the U.S. Department of Labor has guidelines governing who is exempt or nonexempt—and a person’s status is not dependent on his or her job title alone.
3. YOU WORK 40 HOURS A WEEK AT ONE JOB, BUT YOU’RE CALLED AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Larry was that you when you went to work for the MCSO in salary pay status)
Classifying people as independent contractors is a strategy many companies use to get out of providing benefits to workers and paying payroll taxes to the government.
That means workers are on the hook to get their own health insurance and pay all of their employment taxes.
Much like exempt/nonexempt status, independent contractor status is determined by much more than what an employer chooses to call a worker.
4. YOU GET DINGED FOR MEAL BREAKS THAT YOU NEVER GOT TO TAKE
Many people end up skipping meal breaks or eating while working to cover busy periods.
However, despite the skipped breaks, some workers still find that that their employer has automatically deducted 30-minute meal breaks for each workday.
If that happens consistently, a person could end up working 20+ hours per month without compensation.

5. YOUR PAY IS LATE, SHORT, OR YOUR CHECK IS NO GOOD

Some employers intentionally write bad checks and then make themselves unavailable to workers.
Some employers accuse workers of breaking or stealing equipment and then deduct these expenses from their paychecks.
And some businesses continually give the “I’ll pay you next week” excuse … and then the employee finds that he or she is owed weeks or months of compensation.  HOW ABOUT YEARS??????
What would a commander in chief stand to gain by underpaying employees? Payroll checks are written at the County Commission Office so it can't be about cash flow.  A balanced budget makes the boss look good.  The boss can impress their peers, state organizations, the county commission, and the citizens with their ability to balance the budget during significant budget cuts.

In the meantime the boss spends money building an empire, playing horse and pony shows, traveling, being a no show commander in chief, and ensuring your employee's live near the poverty line.  In addition to duplicating efforts such as managing your own dispatch at the sume of $400,000.00.  If the stories we have heard are true, Franklin may want to hold on to the $400,000.00 to pay back pay.

Chain of Command Basics
A chain of command is present in any organization with a formal structure. Small businesses usually have relatively shallow command chains, but even a company with an owner, manager and one employee has a chain of command. In essence, the chain outlines the reporting relationships and amount of authority held at each level of the organization. It refers to the intended order or flow of communication of decisions, concerns and feedback. A retail sales associate, in typical situations, should communicate concerns with a store manager before going directly to a district or regional manager.

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